In 350 Words or Less: Education Blues

schoolkids

If you are one of my kids, you know how, “tiger mom”, I am about education. I am very big on it and it saddens me to see the hit that education has or is taking in life right now or ever; from the ridiculous rising debt/cost of higher education to the rising gun violence on college campuses and public schools. I am pessimistic that, by the time Aspen makes it to college, it will be obsolete, and/or impossible for normal people to attain, and I am not just talking about higher education.

But worse, have you heard about the public school system in New Orleans, LA? I’m sure you have, if not, you can read about it here and here. I find it hard to believe that a major city in America can no longer afford to provide traditional public education to its children. Beginning next school year, New Orleans will have the first all-charter school system in the country. Charter schools are publicly funded, but operate independently

I am not sure if it is still the case today, I’m sure it has changed,  but when I was in grade school, charter schools were seen as negative, alternative school options. It was pretty much like where all of the bad kids go when they get kicked out of public and private school. According to several articles, the root of the change in New Orleans is corruption and poor performances. Maybe, it’s my ignorance of the system, and I will definitely find out more about it, but I don’t see how switching to an all charter school system will get rid of corruption and poor performance. If anything, I see more potential for a wider range of corruption in a charter organization and for the manifestation of a plethora of discriminatory issues. As the article states, it is still somewhat of an experiment, and I hope that it gets better for education in New Orleans. At the end of the day, we just want our kids to be able to go to school and receive a decent, if not, a good education.

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7 thoughts on “In 350 Words or Less: Education Blues

  1. Sasha says:

    Wow, that is interesting! I am curious to see how things go with that! On a side note, my daughter’s name is Boston. We were debating between it and Aspen–love the name!! 🙂

    • It is, and I want to see if other cities will follow sometime down the line. And thank you, it was initially Asher, but husband had the last word, as I named my other 2. Boston is a unique and pretty name, I think this is the first time I have heard of it for a girl’s name 🙂

  2. Dj says:

    That is really sad….as Americans we have made a business out of education hence the higher college tuitions.

  3. Paris says:

    How do you even fix something like this though..? I see this stemming from intense behavioral issues from a majority of students, demographically from that region at least. You can try to put highly qualified teachers there, but if children don’t want to learn, what in the hell can you do? It’s almost becoming a culture… But then again, you can trace this all back to so many factors: bad economy, impact of natural disasters, etc. I feel like more & more people from Louisiana are moving into Texas, and when you bring up issues like this, I can see why.

    Hopefully a solution can be found… Because I agree; the thought of education becoming more & more of a commodity is scary. It’s a RIGHT everyone has.

  4. Nadine says:

    It’s very sad. However, with schools like KIPP and YES, charter schools have started losing their negative connotations. I’m skeptical of a system where the community has no input but a board of directors for some company that’s not in community does. More so, for my fellow New Orleanians who are still there, they have to become more invested & interactive for things to change. It’s all about big business now, not community.

    • I agree. To me, there is a greater potential for corruption with a publicly funded organization that does not have to answer to the public and/or does not require community input. But we shall see.

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